Stop. Change. Introduce. Day 5 #Teacher5aday

Question: With the new curriculum changes & increased accountability measures what will you stop doing, change, or introduce for your own well-being?

Amy Jeetley has posed this question in a post for today’s #Teacher5adayslowchat.

Stop – Marking work that’s littered with silly mistakes or incomplete.

I dread to think how much marking time is taken up by staff up and down the country writing ‘remember your capital letters’, ‘underline your date and title’ etc. That’s a lot of effort reminding pupils to do things they’ve been taught at primary. Those are also the books that take the longest to mark and for little impact because, let’s be honest, pupils KNOW they should use capital letters for names and a beautifully written reminder is probably just white noise. For this reason (unless there’s a real reason which needs addressing in another way e.g. SEN, literacy) the work is getting sent back to be proof read/completed to a decent standard/getting done again* before I’ll mark it.

(* delete as appropriate)

I’m also just taking time to embed habits that I’ve already talked about here.

Change -The way I set homework.

This week I read a suggestion on Twitter of pupils writing the homework title at the top of a page and then leaving two pages before starting the lesson work. I’m going to trial that next year to reduce the amount of time I spend flicking through books checking homework.

Introduce – One evening a week set aside specifically for university study: that can’t be swallowed up by a school work to-do list

Obviously, it takes up a significant proportion of my non-work time, but I quite like the idea of leaving work at 3:30 on a set day, sitting in a coffee shop indulging some reading for an hour before going home and getting a solid few hours writing done.

Happiness starts now. Have a break.

Credit: Brainspores.com
Credit: Brainspores.com

When somebody else verbalises the thoughts you’ve been pondering for a while, it’s an enlightening experience. I had the privilege of watching Andy Cope (@BeingBrilliant) deliver a keynote presentation this morning and the key, very refreshing, message is that happiness is a myth. It sounds depressing but actually, what he suggests is that we’ve bought into a myth that happiness is just something we’ll achieve if… if what…?

  • If we lose a few pounds?
  • If we upgrade the car?
  • If we land the promotion?
  • If we get good results?
  • If we have a successful Ofsted?

By buying into this myth, we’re actually depriving ourselves of valuing the here and now by continually waiting for the time when we’ll have ticked off all the happiness criteria. It’s a myth because no sooner have you achieved the ‘I’ll be happy when…’ target, something else takes its place.

Continue reading “Happiness starts now. Have a break.”