Reflection

Reflections and a pledge – #Teacher5aday

This year I jumped on the Teacher5aday bandwagon with some posts about workload, time-saving techniques, things I'm going to stop, change and introduce, and why happiness starts now. As the year draws to a close, it seems that it's an apt time for reflection on the year's successes and things to look forward to in 2017… Continue reading Reflections and a pledge – #Teacher5aday

Part Time Student, Reflection, Staff Development, Wellbeing

Stop. Change. Introduce. Day 5 #Teacher5aday

Question: With the new curriculum changes & increased accountability measures what will you stop doing, change, or introduce for your own well-being? Amy Jeetley has posed this question in a post for today's #Teacher5adayslowchat. Stop - Marking work that's littered with silly mistakes or incomplete. I dread to think how much marking time is taken up by staff… Continue reading Stop. Change. Introduce. Day 5 #Teacher5aday

Leadership, Reflection, Research, Uncategorized

Critical conversations in educational leadership

On 26th April I was lucky enough to share a platform and discussion space with teachers, researchers and academics discussing some critical issues and conversations in educational leadership at a BELMAS/BERA event at Newcastle University. Within half and hour it was clear that the concept of 'critical conversations' can be interpreted in a range of ways but largely… Continue reading Critical conversations in educational leadership

Assessment, Curriculum, English, Progress, Wellbeing

‘Whatever it takes’ Some reflections on intervention

I used to believe that'whatever it takes' was a sign of commitment and high expectations. I don't any more. 'Whatever it takes' risks increasing teacher workload for limited gain,  allows students to abdicate responsibility for their own learning and can promote a culture of low expectations. Imagine a teacher writing lesson plans outlining what they're doing for every single… Continue reading ‘Whatever it takes’ Some reflections on intervention

Reflection, Staff Development, Wellbeing

On workload. #Teacher5adayslowchat

It's important to discuss workload and well-being. It's also important that it's discussed in an open and positive way that doesn't become endless complaining and blaming. This is where I think #Teacher5aday has got it right and their slowchat (#Teacher5adayslowchat) is worth a look to hear how teachers, leaders and schools are working together for happy healthy… Continue reading On workload. #Teacher5adayslowchat

Leadership, Reflection, Staff Development

Pass it on: top time-saving tips

I'm a big fan of the #teacher5aday hashtags and discussion of work-life balance on Twitter that I'm always talking about things I've seen online or great little 'tweaks' that make life just that little bit easier. I'm going to attempt to recap some the great advice I've been given for work-life balance (both in person and online).… Continue reading Pass it on: top time-saving tips

Curriculum

Rethinking differentiation: getting the most out of questions

"Inspectors reported concerns about Key Stage 3 in one in five of the routine inspections analysed, particularly in relation to the slow progress made in English and mathematics and the lack of challenge for the most able pupils." (Ofsted, KS3 'The Wasted Years', 2015) When I trained, the common approach to differentiation was to teach to… Continue reading Rethinking differentiation: getting the most out of questions

Leadership, Staff Development

What WomenEd means to me

Following our inaugural YamJam, our WomenEd ideas session started me thinking about what WomenEd means to me. The advantage of such a self-supporting movement, led by a fabulous steering group, is that it's an open house, a place for sharing ideas, collaboration and personal reflection. For me, I see WomenEd as a sustainable grass-roots movement that nurtures female leadership… Continue reading What WomenEd means to me

Curriculum, English, Literacy, Literature, Progress

Reclaiming KS3: Engagement

In this series of blogposts I'm exploring ways that KS3 can be reclaimed rather than being viewed as a second priority behind KS4/5. To go further, what I'm suggesting is that if schools want to ensure maximum progress gains at KS4, then targeted investment in KS3 is essential. The three ways that this can be achieved are: Challenge… Continue reading Reclaiming KS3: Engagement

Curriculum, English, Progress

Reclaiming KS3: Challenge

There's been a lot of focus on KS3 and the role it plays in achievement at KS4. Sometimes I wonder if due to pressures in the upper school, KS3 risks becoming the neglected sibling of KS4/5. It shouldn't be. If KS3 is purposeful, challenging and engaging, the chances of having the progress gaps to be filled… Continue reading Reclaiming KS3: Challenge