Why I’ll defend EdTech, but accept it’s not the magic solution to pupil progress

There’s been a lot of discussion in the press about tablet devices, mobile phones and other technological approaches to teaching and learning. The general trend from comments close to the government is that tablets and mobile phones are inherently a problem (Pupils set for ban on mobiles and iPads in the classroom to stop lessons being disrupted). For me, articles like this risk conflating two separate issues: use of mobile devices as a behaviour issue and thoughtful use of educational technology. Grouping the two together is unhelpful.

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I’m not for one second suggesting that there should be a free for all with mobile phones in school. In fact, I’m very much in favour of having strict policies for their use and consistently enforced sanctions for those students who choose to ignore basic rules. But the more this debate goes on, there’s a danger of throwing the baby out with the bathwater, so to speak.

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Leadership… what it means to me.

Having just had my first leadership development meeting and been inspired to get involved with #WomenEd North East, I thought I’d jump on the digital bandwagon musing about the nature of leadership (and hopefully achieve it without it becoming a bit of a buzz-word soup).

workloadGood leadership is about looking after people. It means being aware of pressures and workload. It means not piling another ‘little thing’ on without removing something else, because all those little things add up and the price may not be paid in school. Most teachers can think of stories where those little extra things make a difference between a teacher doing the little extra, marking their books or seeing their family/participating in their hobby/ seeing their partner. If they feel their family has to come last, then something has gone drastically wrong. Leadership is about priorities and understanding you can’t have a list of two-dozen priorities; that would be like Nicki Morgan and Michael Gove wanting all schools to be above average. It just doesn’t work. Good leaders help people to prioritise and to work smarter; they know when to remove a burden and they know the value of a chat over a cup of tea (or beverage of choice). Essentially good leaders know how to build people up with positivity and support.

Continue reading “Leadership… what it means to me.”